Day One 3 is out and I’m not going to use it anymore. Yesterday I exported all my stuff and deleted my account. Usually I’m fine paying for subscriptions, but in this case, I’m afraid of lock-in. There is precious stuff in my database and I don’t want to keep it on their servers.

I have a Day One to WordPress importer, which I created a couple of months ago, but I’m still not comfortable using it on a site that publicly available on the web regardless of having my Day One entries imported as private posts. What I’m going to do instead is set up an Ubuntu install in VMware, install WordPress on it, and run it locally. I’m not going to write there—I’ve consolidated all my text into Ulysses—but it’s a nice way to browse this archive sometimes. Maybe someday I’ll import everything into Ulysses as well, just have it at hand.

I’ve had separate RSS feeds before for statuses and posts. I’ve removed them and everything is collected under one feed now. Why did I do that?

  • It’s easier for me to post things since I don’t have to deal with categories and decide which feed get what.
  • I don’t post as many status updates as I expected, so no need to worry about filtering them out for specific groups.
  • My subscribers get everything. No skipped posts just because you subscribed to the wrong feed.
  • If you use a decent RSS service, you can filter stuff for yourself.

A Commonplace (book/blog)

Of course, the natural extension of this new notebook was to start sharing some extracts online, specifically on micro.blog. It reminded me of the charm of early blogging. When it wasn’t so serious, when you didn’t need a specific goal or career from it and mistakes were useful and a sign of growth. You didn’t (and don’t) have to present yourself as an expert in something you just started out in.